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The Jadavpur Association of International Relations (JAIR)

The First Ever Association for the Scholars and Pratitioners of International Relations in India

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FIFTY YEARS OF INDIA-BANGLADESH RELATIONS: REGIONALISM, CONNECTIVITY AND THE NORTH EAST

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Theme:

 

FIFTY YEARS OF INDIA-BANGLADESH RELATIONS: REGIONALISM, CONNECTIVITY AND THE NORTH EAST

Dates: 14th and 15th February, 2020

Venue:

Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR)

North Eastern Regional Centre

NEHU Campus,  Umshing

Shillong 793 022, Meghalaya

 

Concept Note

 

India was the first country to recognize Bangladesh as a separate and independent state and established diplomatic relations with the country immediately after its independence in December 1971. India’s links with Bangladesh are civilizational, cultural, social and economic. There is much that unites the two countries – a shared history and common heritage, linguistic and cultural ties, passion for music, literature and the arts. This commonality is reflected in multi-dimensional and expanding relations between India and Bangladesh. In the last more than four decades, the two countries have continued to consolidate their relations and have built a comprehensive institutional framework to promote bilateral cooperation in all areas. The emergence of Bangladesh had an immense impact on the global power alignment, paving the way for rise of South Asia. This ‘Asianism’ becomes more important in the face of the unequal economic relations between developing and developed countries. In this unequal exchange, the terms of trade has almost always been against the developing countries and in favour of the developed powers and the international financial institutions have only served to strengthen this trend. In this sense, regional economic cooperation is arguably the only way to overcome the problems of unequal and adverse terms of trade. Economic cooperation at the regional level effectively allows the developing countries of the region to become interdependent while overcoming any form of dependency on the developed powers. Thus, the mutual economic relations began in the form of economic assistance provided by India to a war torn Bangladesh but has eventually developed as trade relations between two Asian emerging powers. In the recent years the geographical land lockedness of the North East India (NEI) is being looked upon in a more positive way. Efforts are being made to convert the region into the ‘land linked’ from the ‘land-locked’ so that it can make faster economic progress through effective utilization of contiguous markets of Bangladesh, Myanmar and beyond. Policy level initiatives are rolled out so that North East India, as a whole, does not remain a burdensome periphery to the country. Especially the cooperation between Bangladesh and the North East India will bring a huge change in the goodwill of both countries. Bangladesh has approved an agreement to allow North-Eastern States of India to use Chittagong sea port and Mongla river ports in Bangladesh. This will restore pre-partition logistics arrangements, when the North East India was served by the then East Bengal ports.

On the other hand, South-South Cooperation between the two countries was reinforced by the creation of sub regional cooperation which provides yet another avenue where the two countries have cooperated being a part of groupings which seek to expand South Asia’s connectivity including Mekong Ganga Cooperation Initiative, BIMSTEC (Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation), BCIM (Bangladesh China India Myanmar) economic corridor project and other related initiatives.  

Today, the bilateral relations between the two countries have been consolidating at a fast pace. The remarkable feature about Indo-Bangladesh relations, has been the persistent dialogue with a focus on mutual good. This has allowed Bangladesh to evolve from neighbours to partners in growth and economic development. Moreover, Sheikh Hasina’s visit to Delhi in 2010 laid the foundations for a comprehensive framework for cooperation. Bangladesh has provided India with logistical assistance for setting up the Paltana plant in Tripura. India in turn is promoting Bangladesh’s energy security by encouraging investments in power generation. Bangladesh has enjoyed a steady economic growth owing to its progressive policies and a vibrant civil society. Bangladesh has effectively dealt with questions relating to terrorism and  set up an anti-terror task force. A landmark in relations was reached when Bangladesh conveyed an assurance that anti-India activities from its territory would not be entertained. Subsequently several agreements were signed with Bangladesh which pertained to cooperation in security issues and Bangladesh implemented various measures to curb extremism and passed legislation to provide information relating to the financing of terrorism to other countries when so requested. This is particularly significant for defence ties were suspended for a very long time and resumed only after 2006, with joint military exercise and counter insurgency operations. Along with the visit of Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj and the visit of Hon’ble Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi in June 2015 to Bangladesh laid down the milestone in India–Bangladesh relations. In this landmark visit, 22 deals were signed and renewed on a wider range of issue areas including connectivity, power, trade and investment and security. From Bangladesh side, the official visit paid by the President of Bangladesh Abdul Hamid, in December 2014 to India, the first visit by a ceremonial head of state of Bangladesh since 1972, contributed to strengthen the bilateral relations in a larger way.

As  India shifts its focus to the neighbourhood, Bangladesh remains an important conduit for India’s Act east policy, this calls for not only greater economic cooperation between  North-East India and Bangladesh but also greater cultural and educational ties which in itself can serve the migrant issue which has served as a potential hurdle in greater cooperation.

Bangladesh and India have experienced a relationship marked by up’s and down. However in the age of growing interdependence, shared priorities, prosperities there is no alternative but elevate India-Bangladesh relations which should be based on mutual understanding, respect, reciprocity and trust. The democratic forces on both sides have expressed adequate political will, mutual understanding and confidence in recent years.

The 1990s was a decade that witnessed several events which had far reaching consequences for the world. The decade saw the rise of globalisation, with a phenomenon change in the world economy. Also, it was the time when the Indian Foreign Policy establishment and apparatus underwent a complete reform. India started to search for partners in the International Arena, more specifically in Asia itself. The other important factor was the economic transformation of India that ensued as a result of embracing liberalization. The subsequent economic growth registered by India necessitated that its search for new trading partners, and to that end establish a broad regional framework incorporating  South East Asia and East Asia,  within which India could advance its economic and geopolitical interests.  In this context, it must be kept in mind that the uneven pace at which globalization proliferated throughout the globe facilitated a radical transformation of International Political Economic Frontiers. The reappearance of regionalism was a natural consequence of the disproportionate patterns of growth and trends of development in the developing nations. Regional political, cultural and economic agreements have multiplied worldwide; almost all countries are parties to at least one agreement and many are parties to multiple agreements. Agreements have been reinvigorated and expanded while new ones are being negotiated and concluded.

Integration measures have extended their reach beyond traditional free trade in goods to a number of domestic regulatory spheres including services, investment and intellectual property rights, to deepen the integration among partner countries. Developing regions like South Asia and Southeast Asia are particularly interested in such a project, as it is an essential avenue towards the objectives of economic growth, development and poverty alleviation. Therefore, the task of ensuring a positive correlation between regional integration and national political and economic agenda has occupied centrality in the policy issues of the developing countries.

During this time, the most systematic policy was articulated by Indian foreign policy experts in 1991 under Prime Minister Shri P.V. Narasimha Rao in the form of the Look East Policy. The relations with ASEAN were pursued with a lot of enthusiasm and dynamism which saw India became sectoral dialogue partner with ASEAN in 1992 and full dialogue partner in 1995. In 1998, Prime Minister Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayee intended to accelerate India’s Look East Policy (LEP).  In the first phase, the emphasis was on political, diplomatic and people to people relationships, Track II diplomacy became one of the earliest vehicles to conduct a successful Look East Policy. More emphasis was placed on improving connectivity. An important point to be noted is that one of the major goals of the Look East Policy was the development of the North Eastern region of India adopting the approach of focussing on the geographical proximity of regions, sub-regional cooperation and stress on free trade agreements. This policy has succeeded in bringing India closer to the ASEAN nations but was not fully able to tap the opportunities that such relations could have born. States falling in the North East remained deprived mostly of the benefits that could have been accrued from the policy being followed in earnest.

The “Act East Policy”, unveiled during the India-ASEAN Summit in Myanmar in November 2014 is being projected as the new economic development strategy for India’s North Eastern Region (NER). The fundamental commitments displayed by this policy has been towards varnishing the process of regional integration, intensifying connectivity and building upon the cultural symmetry between India and Southeast Asia, deepen cooperation in a number of areas including but not limited to trade, security, investment and tourism. Several important steps have been taken to improve connectivity in the region, chief among them being the Kaladan Multimodal Project and the Asian highway,  the geographical position of which is the Moreh (India)-Tamu (Myanmar) road going on to the Kalemyo railway and then to Mandalay in Myanmar. A four-lane Asian Highway is sought between New Delhi-Singapore linked to Kuala Lumpur, Ho Chi Minh City, Phnom Pen, Bangkok, Vientiane, Yangon, Mandalay, Kalemyo, Tamu, Dhaka, and Kolkata.

The most important motivator for India and Southeast and East Asia to establish a synergy is the prospect of an Asian Century. Indeed the Indian political brass has to pursue a two-part policy, bring about the sufficient development of the Northeast, and construct an alternative vision for Asia as opposed to the Chinese Dream of a Unipolar Asia. Since becoming Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi has advocated a ‘Look East, Link West Policy’ pointing to a broader Indo-Pacific conceptualisation of India’s region.

It is very important to understand at this point that successfully pursuing Act East Policy would require economic expediency, a more expanded market, addressing the economic requirements of the countries included in the ambit of Act East. Secondly it would require a robust and clear regional security policy envisioning a concrete uniform security interest. Given the importance of India’s North East for powering its Act East policy, India’s age-old relations with Bangladesh are also witnessing a fresh momentum with various ongoing initiatives:

 

  • In terms of connectivity, there is trans-shipment of Indian goods through Bangladesh’s Ashuganj port to Northeast India, expanding of rail links within Northeast India and between the two countries, the BBIN (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal) Motor Vehicles Agreement which has the potential to substantially reduce the cost of transportation between Northeast India and the rest of India.
  • India is a growing investor in Bangladesh, and now has land earmarked for development of special “Indian economic zones” in Bangladesh.
  • Energy cooperation is now at the centre of New Delhi’s biggest business commitments, with power and gas leading the $9-billion investment projects India has proposed to make in Bangladesh to help strengthen Dhaka’s emerging industrial base.
  • In terms of connectivity with ports, the Bangladesh Cabinet in September 2018, has approved use of its Chattogram (earlier known as Chittagong) and Mongla ports for Indian shipments to north-eastern states of India. The agreement will provide India access to Bangladeshi ports to carry goods to the landlocked North Eastern states in a very short time. The Chattogram port is the busiest seaport on the coastline of Bay of Bengal, which handles around 90% of import-export trade of Bangladesh. Mongla port is the second largest port of the country and it is located in Bengal Delta. This is a major boost for India’s connectivity both with the North east as well as with Myanmar and beyond.
  • Deeper cooperation would also facilitate access to energy supplies through projects such as the natural gas pipeline linking Myanmar to India via Bangladesh.
  • It is an established fact that "Act East Policy” starts with Bangladesh. India is already working on mutually beneficial projects with Bangladesh. On the other hand, Myanmar is the gateway to South East Asia. Taking in to this consideration the Conference will aim at the issues and opportunities during the 50 years of India-Bangladesh Relations and how India’s Act East Policy will get new momentum in recent years by linking Bangladesh North East India and Myanmar.
  • The most important motivator for India and Southeast and East Asia to establish a synergy is the prospect of an Asian Century. Since becoming Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi has advocated a ‘Look East, Link West Policy’ pointing to a broader Indo-Pacific conceptualisation of India’s region.

It is very important to understand at this point that successfully pursuing Act East Policy would require economic expediency, a more expanded market, addressing the economic requirements of the countries included in the ambit of Act East Policy. Secondly, it would require a robust and clear regional security policy envisioning a concrete uniform security interest. In specific terms, the proposed Conference aims to identify:

  1. Opportunities, challenges and action plans for enabling an economic integration of the North Eastern Region with Bangladesh and Southeast Asian countries.
  2. Create a Platform for decision makers and stakeholders for different segments to converge and discuss opportunities for greater and beneficial engagement between the North Eastern Region and BIMSTEC countries, especially Bangladesh and Myanmar.
  3. In this context, the conference propose to discuss specific opportunities, challenges, and issues for expanding trade and economic cooperation between North East India and BIMSTEC countries, with special reference to potential sectors for cooperation, transport linkages, and infrastructure as well as trade facilitation requirements.
  4. Discuss further engagement possibilities beyond trade and investment related to social upliftment of the population in both India and Bangladesh as well as people to people exchanges.
  5. Bring out a set of specific recommendations for action and interventions on bilateral and multilateral base including role and responsible identification.
  6. Explore the possibilities for the Border Trade between India and Bangladesh and India and Myanmar.

The conference will focus the following areas:

 

  • Change and continuity in Policy Towards North East: From Look East to Act East
  • India's Act East Policy: Theoretical Perspectives
  • The Economic Relations between India, Bangladesh and South East Asian Countries through Act East Policy
  • The Asian Century and India-Bangladesh Relations: Change and Continuity
  • India’s Bangladesh and Myanmar policy: Border Trade
  • BIMSTEC, BCIM, BBIN and India’s Act East Policy
  • Regionalism and India’s Act East Policy
  • Maritime co-operation between India and Bangladesh involving North East India

Last Date for Sending Abstracts: 20th September, 2019

Abstract must be of 150 words, with title and 5 key words.

Abstract must be typed in Microsoft Word , Times New Roman, 12 pt. for the body of Abstract and 12 pt bold for the title of the paper. The Abstract must include the name of the paper presenter along with Institute of Affiliation, Present Designation, and e-mail.

Abstracts to be sent at: info@jair.net.in and also at imankalyanlahiri@gmail.com

Last date regarding the intimation of selection of Abstract: 1st November, 2019

Last date for sending Full papers: 15th November, 2019

Registration Fees:

For Teachers: Rs. 2000/-

For Scholars and M.Phil Students: Rs. 1500/-

For Undergraduate and Post Graduate Students: Rs. 1500/-

For International Participants: US$ 350

Last Date for Registration: 30th September 2019

Registration is not dependent on the Selection of the Abstracts

Kindly click the following link for Registration /Accommodation Charges and Transport Costs:

https://www.payumoney.com/store/#/buy/shillong

NO TA/DA will be paid to the participants.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON Engaging Asia: India’s Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON

Engaging Asia: India’s Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Organized by

THE JADAVPUR ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (JAIR)

In collaboration with:

School of International Relations and Strategic Studies (SIRSS), Jadavpur University

Supported by:

Indian Council of World Affairs (ICWA), New Delhi

20th and 21st September, 2019

Kolkata

CONCEPT NOTE

Engaging Asia: India’s Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Post 1947 India has been destined to play significant role in International Relations. The question has always been, how. Indian foreign policy has travelled thus far through myriad events and discourses. There has been the presence and experience of both continuity and change. The starting point of India’s foreign policy is undoubtedly Nehruvian discourse. It is true that foreign policy framers had realities in front of them both foreign and domestic in nature during the decades from fifties onwards. The reality of the Cold War presented India with opportunities, yet dangers weighed greater. Thus India’s journey to play important role internationally started with Non Aligned Movement. Reality pressed India to frame its foreign policy according to necessity. It was not long since independence and India faced complex security problems along and across the border west, north and eastward. Decisiveness characterized Indian foreign policy when wars became inevitable. The creation of Bangladesh worked as a pivot for Indian foreign policy. During the Cold War era India tried to attain two things. One was not to get embroiled directly in the musings of the Cold War and secondly India had tried to balance the two blocks as need arose.  

The decade of eighties basically has been like a buffer between the realities erstwhile and the realities emerging out of very new political and economic narratives. The ‘iron curtain’ in the east collapsed. The Cold War came to an end. Globalization ensured the advent of new ideas of economics. International finance, climate change, energy security were the new issues to be considered through the prism of foreign policy. The decade of eighties saw China opening up its economy. That posed a real challenge for India’s foreign policy. The eighties gave rise to another security challenge for India. Pakistan resorted to proxy war with India via terrorism. Soon after, India to the decision to transform its economy prompted by the pulls and pressures of global economic imperatives. It marked a definitive move away from the decades of license raj to a more open and expectant economy. And this move paved the way for a greater engagement of India with the world as a strong economy is one of the pre-requisites of a dynamic foreign policy.  It was also around this time that India conducted its first and second nuclear tests. With the turn of the millennium, the country cautiously began to develop its role. greater engagement in the neighbourhood, with the U.S and increasing involvement in multilateral forums characterized this period as the country finally broke free from the constrains of non-alignment.

Indian Foreign Policy in the Post-Liberalization period not only engaged itself with  its traditional core values of Non-Alignment but also engaged itself in an increasingly adopted a  more comprehensive way to engage itself internationally, what came to be known as Multi-Alignment. The second decade of the 2000s is gradually but definitively becoming one of establishing the country firmly on the global foreign policy map. Prime Minister Modi’s ‘neighbourhood first’ policy and the refurbishing of the intermittently active Look-East Policy to a more energetic Act East Initiative has stirred South and South east Asian politics. His foreign visits to countries that previous heads of state have not visited in years and strategic and economic deals that have followed have contributed to the building of the perception of a dynamic India that is intent on engaging with the world. The Indo-Pacific is another significant region where the country is playing a vital role through its maritime strides and boosting relations with littoral states.

In the age of globalization, more than ever before that India is both willing and increasingly able to participate and establish its presence on the world stage. The purpose of this seminar is first to trace the continuities and changes in India’s foreign policy transitioning from the twentieth century to the new millennium. Secondly, the seminar would aim to unravel the new dynamics of Indian foreign policy in the context of regionalism and sub-regionalism. Thirdly, this seminar would suggest how India can play a defining role in shaping the course of the globe in the 2st century and secure its interests. The seminar would generate new insights on how India can engage and engaging itself with its immediate neighbours to successfully implement its foreign policy in the age of globalization.

India’s engagements in East and South East Asia manifested in the Look East and more recently, in the Act East policy. The emphasis is here upon India-ASEAN relations, sub-regional cooperation and the need to respond to increased Chinese muscle flexing. Indo-ASEAN trade amounts to 81.3 billion dollars and the Free Trade Area between the two in the Asia-Pacific region provides future scope to India to expand its markets and its sphere of influence. India’s relations with Japan and Korea are instrumental in this regard. Increasing Japanese investment in India is cementing ties between the two countries, as they try to curtail the ever-growing Chinese security and economic profile in East and South East Asia. The Indian Stand on the South China Sea dispute is key here and that it has upheld the sanctity of the UNCLOS is a positive sign. India must also not completely spook China, as it could amount to an undesirable showdown. In this context, India can assist China in gaining membership of the Missile Technology Control Regime in return for being allowed by China to become a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. India is also a member of the Shanghai Cooperation, thereby possessing a strategic pivot to Central Asia.

It is noteworthy that India is successfully implementing its foreign policy in states like Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka with respect to their faith in her ability to be the net security provider in South Asia. Notably, India’s efforts in restoring peace and stability in Afghanistan have been appreciated internationally.

The message is clear. India is coming to its own. It is now, more than ever before that India is both willing and increasingly able to participate and establish its presence on the world stage.

In this context, the Conference attempts to examine the evolution of India’s foreign policy along the following themes:

  • Change and continuity in India’s foreign policy.
  • Influence of the early makers of the India’s Foreign Policy in the contemporary understanding of India’s Foreign Policy
  • The story of India rising.
  • The Asian Century and Indian foreign policy.
  • India’s Neighbourhood policy
  • Security dynamics of Indian foreign policy in Asia.
  • Non-traditional security threats and India’s role in Asia
  • India in the Indo-Pacific: Enhancing footprints.

Last Date for Sending Abstracts: 5th August, 2019

Abstract must be of 150 words, with title and 5 key words.

Abstract must be typed in Microsoft Word , Times New Roman, 12 pt. for the body of Abstract and 12 pt bold for the title of the paper. The Abstract must include the name of the paper presenter along with Institute of Affiliation, Present Designation, and e-mail.

Abstracts to be sent at: info@jair.net.in and also at imankalyanlahiri@gmail.com

Last date for sending Full papers: 15th September, 2019

Registration Fees:

For Teachers: Rs. 200/-

For Scholars and M.Phil Students: Rs. 150/-

For Undergraduate and Post Graduate Students: Rs. 100/-

For International Participants: US$ 200

Last Date for Registration: 5th August, 2019

Registration is not dependent on the Selection of the Abstracts

Kindly click the following link for Registration:

https://www.payumoney.com/store/buy/icwaconference

Last Date for the Intimation regarding the selection of the Abstracts: 30th August 2019

Last Date for sending Full Paper: 15th September, 2019 for publication.

NO TA/DA will be paid to the participants.

 

 

WORKSHOP ON RESEARCH METHODS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND RELATED SOCIAL SCIENCES

JAIR in collaboration with The School of International Relations and Strategic Studies, Jadavpur University and UGC-HRDC, University of Burdwan is going to organize a ten-day workshop on Research Methods in International Relations and Related Social Sciences during 1st February2019-14th February 2019, Time: 4.30p.m.-7.30p.m.

The Course fee is Rs. 3500/--.

Minimum Qualification: Pursuing M.A. in International Relations , Political Science, and Related Social Sciences

University and College Teachers are especially encouraged to apply

Interested candidates are requested to apply with their Bio-Data at info@jair.net.in 

Selection will be made on first come first served basis.

Total seats: 30

Interested candidates kindly send their Bio-Data by 15th January 2019. Selected Candidates will be informed by e-mail and the course fee may be submitted online upon the receipt of confirmation mail.

Those who have already applied do not have to apply again.

CALL FOR PAPERS National Conference on “Identity and the Politics of Security, Sovereignty and the Challenges of World Politics”, 2017

MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS-JAIR DISTINGUISHED LECTURE PROGRAMME

The Ministry of External Affairs Distinguished Lecture Programme was delivered by former Ambassador Suresh Goyel on India's Foreign Policy on 9th April 2018 as a part of International Relations Scholastic Conclave supported by JAIR.

IMPORTANT SEMINARS, CONFERENCES , WORKSHOPS ORGANIZED BY JAIR

 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES:

1. 8TH APRIL, 2010-10TH APRIL, 2010 FROM LAND LOCKED TO LAND LINKED: NORTH EAST INDIA IN BIMSTEC NORTH EASTERN HILL UNIVERSITY, SHILLONG PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA AND INDIAN COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, NERC, SHILLONG

2. 27-28 JULY, 2012 VISWAKABI, AND INTERNATIONALISM: RABINDRANATH TAGORE IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY, KOLKATA MINISTRY OF CULTURE, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

3. 17TH AND 19TH AUGUST, 2012 INDIA & HER NEIGHBOURS: REVISITING RELATIONS WITH NEPAL, BHUTAN, MYANMAR, SRI LANKA, MALDIVES AND BANGLADESH MANIPUR UNIVERSITY, MANIPUR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, INDIAN COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, NEW DELHI, AND MAKAIAS, KOLKATA

4. 19-20TH AUGUST, 2013 REGIONALISM, SUB-REGIONALISM AND CONNECTIVITY: INDIA'S FOREIGN POLICY IN THE 21ST CENTURY MIZORAM UNIVERSITY, AIZAWAL PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, INDIAN COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, NEW DELHI, AND MAKAIAS, KOLKATA

5. 27 February, 2014-1ST MARCH, 2014 FUTURE OF INDIA MYANMAR ENGAGEMENT: EXISTING IMPEDIMENTS, UNTAPPED OPPORTUNITIES OBSERVER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, KOLKATA MAULANA ABUL KALAM AZAD INSTITUTE OF ASIAN STUDIES( MAKAIAS) AND OBSERVER RESEARCH FOUNDATION (ORF), KOLKATA CHAPTER

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS:

17TH-18TH AUGUST, 2011 INDIA’S CONSTRUCTIVE ENGAGEMENT IN ASIA AND AFRICA IN THE 21ST CENTURY HOTEL HINDUSTHAN INTERNATIONAL, KOLKATA AND JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY, KOLKATA PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, INDIAN COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, NEW DELHI, MAKAIAS, KOLKATA

 NATIONAL SEMINARS AND CONFERENCES:

26TH JULY, 2008 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN THE 21ST CENTURY JIBANANANDA SABHAGRIHA, KOLKATA JAIR

28-29TH MARCH, 2009 THE CHALLENGE OF TERRORISM JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY, KOLKATA MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA. INAUGURATED BY SRI VINOD KUMAR, JOINT SECRETARY, PUBLIC DIPLOMACY, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

19TH MARCH, 2010 INDIA’S ENERGY SECURITY IN THE 21ST CENTURY JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

16TH NOVEMBER, 2009 INDO~US RELATIONS UNDER OBAMA PRESIDENCY AMERICAN CENTER, KOLKATA AMERICAN CENTER, KOLKATA 

11TH MARCH 2012 RE-READING RAM MOHUN ROY: A 21ST CENTURY PERSPECTIVE RAJA RAM MOHUN ROY MEMORIAL MUSEUM, KOLKATA RAJA RAM MOHUN ROY MEMORIAL MUSEUM

 23RD AND 24TH AUGUST, 2013 QUESTIONING IDENTITY: RESPONSE OF THE STATE AND COMMUNITY IN CONTEMPORARY INDIA DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY, BARRRACKPORE RASTRAGURU SURENDRANATH COLLEGE, WEST BENGAL UNIVERSITY GRANTS COMMISSION (UGC) AND DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND SOCIOLOGY, BARRRACKPORE RASTRAGURU SURENDRANATH COLLEGE

28TH TO 30TH OCTOBER, 2014 , NORTHEAST IN INDIA’S LOOK EAST: ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, GUWAHATI PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS), ICSSR, NEW DELHI, MAKAIAS, KOLKATA AND INDIAN COUNCIL OF WORLD AFFAIRS, NEW DELHI

2ND TO 4TH NOVEMBER, 2015 INDIA IN THE EMERGING WORLD ORDER; ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES ST. JOSEPH’S COLLEGE, DARJEELING, MAULANA ABUL KALAM AZAD INSTITUTE OF ASIAN STUDIES (MAKAIAS) AND ICSSR, NEW DELHI

19TH AND 20TH DECEMBER, 2016 INDIA’S FOREIGN POLICY IN THE 21ST CENTURY, GOVERNANCE AND FOREIGN POLICY IMPERATIVES DEPARTMENT OF CIVICS AND POLITICS, MUMBAI UNIVERSITY INDIAN COUNCIL OF WORLD AFFAIRS (ICWA), OBSERVER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, NEW DELHI, MAKAIAS, KOLKATA

SPECIAL LECTURE PROGRAMME

1. 20TH JULY, 2008 THE LAUNCHING OF THE JADAVPUR ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS JIBANANANDA SABHAGRIHA, KOLKATA SRI AMIT DASGUPTA, JOINT SECRETARY, PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVT. OF INDIA.

2. 19TH JANUARY, 2009 MEDIA AS A CAREER JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY, KOLKATA BHABESH DAS, NEWS EDITOR, PRASAR BHARATI, AKASHVANI, KOLKATA AND SRI PRADEEP GOOPTU, RESIDENT EDITOR, BUSINESS STANDARD

3. 13TH SEPTEMBER 2010 MAKING AMERICAN INTEREST GROUPS APPRECIATE INDIA’S CONCERNS & PRIORITIES: A PUBLIC DIPLOMACY EXERCISE ABROAD ON THE DAY JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY, KOLKATA SUPPORTED BY PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA AMBASSADOR RONEN SEN, FORMER AMBASSADOR OF INDIA TO USA

4. 23RD AUGUST 2014, INDIA-BANGLADESH RELATIONS: LOOKING TOWARDS THE FUTURE’ OBSERVER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, KOLKATA MAHBUB HASSAN SALEH, DEPUTY HIGH COMMISSIONER OF BANGLADESH

5. 28TH FEBRUARY, 2015 INDIA’S ACT EAST POLICY RAMAKRISHNA MISSION INSTITUTE OF CULTURE, GOLPARK, KOLKATA PINAK RANJAN CHAKRAVARTY, FORMER SECRETARY EAST, MINISTRY OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

6. 21ST MARCH, 2015 REBEL CAMPS IN MYANMAR: WILL THEY IMPEDE INDIA’S LOOK EAST POLICY? OBSERVER RESEARCH FOUNDATION, KOLKATA SHRI RAJIV BHATTACHARYYA, RENOWNED JOURNALIST AND AUTHOR AND DR. LANGPOKLAKPAM SURAJ SINGH, FACULTY AT THE DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE OF D.M. COLLEGE, (IMPHAL, MANIPUR).

7. 18TH APRIL, 2015 NEW LATIN AMERICA: WHAT IT MEANS FOR INDIA? RAMAKRISHNA MISSION INSTITUTE OF CULTURE, GOLPARK, KOLKATA AMBASSADOR R. VISHWANATHAN

8. 9TH JANUARY, 017 BREXIT AND INDIA JADAVPUR UNIVERSITY AMBASSADOR KRISHNAN SRINIVASAN, FORMER FOREIGN SECRETARY, GOVT. OF INDIA AND SYLVIA MISHRA, ORF, NEW DELHI

 WORKSHOPS:

Taking into consideration the demands of the young researchers of International Relations and related social sciences, the association organized a two days workshop on Research Methods in Political Science / International Relations and Related Social Sciences on 10th-11th December 2010 in active collaboration with the Indian Council of Social Science Research (Eastern Regional Center). The workshop received an overwhelming response from young researchers and proposals have come to conduct workshops on similar lines in the near future. 

 The Association organized the Second Worksop for seven days between 8th August, 2016-17th August 2016 on Research Methods in IR and Related Social Sciences supported by ICSSR-ERC. The same kind of courses have been organized during 2015,2016,2017, 2018

 STUDENTS’ SEMINAR AND ACTIVITIES:

The Association in collaboration with The School of International Relations and Strategic Studies organized a Student’s Seminar on Waves of Democracy in South Asia at K.P.Basu Memorial Hall, Jadavpur University on 26th September 2008.

The Jadavpur Association of International Relations (JAIR) organized a student's seminar in collaboration with the School of International Relations and Strategic Studies, Jadavpur University on 26th September 2009 on India's Foreign Policy: Trends and Perspectives at Jadavpur University.

 JAIR has organized a students’ seminar on India’s Emergence: Through Young Eyes in collaboration with the School of International Relations and Strategic Studies, Jadavpur University on 11th April 2011.

 One of the biggest accomplishments of the association in the year 2010 is sending of postgraduates of International Relations to join the IDSA (New Delhi) and the ICWA (New Delhi) as interns.

An inter-college roundtable on Internet, State, and Democracy: Wiki leaks and Beyond was organized in collaboration with the School of Media, Communications and Culture (Jadavpur University) in 11th January 2012. The roundtable was attended by eminent journalists, students and scholars from different colleges of Kolkata and around.

 A students’ seminar on the theme USA’s Role in South Asia in the 21st Century in collaboration with the American Center (Kolkata) was organized by the association in February 2012.

 An online Student’s Journal of the Association was released on 13th July 2013 by Smt. Riva Ganguly Das, Joint Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India.

 The Association received the Maintenance and Development grant for the year 2013-14 towards the publication of JAIR Journal of International Relations with an ISSN number (ISSN: 2348-7496). The Association is receiving the grant to date.

 JAIR organized a Students’ seminar on India’s Foreign Policy on 2nd April 2016 in collaboration with The School of International Relations and Strategic Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata

 ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS/ BOOK RELEASES

 The association hosted a Round Table  Discussion on the Arab Spring by Ambassador Rajendra Madhukar Abhayankar in collaboration with the Department of International Relations (Jadavpur University) during the year 2012

 JAIR was honored to have Ambassador Muchkund Dubey, Former Foreign Secretary to the Government of India for a discussion on the book India’s Foreign Policy: Coping with the Changing World in November 2012.

 

SPECIAL EVENTS ORGANIZED BY JAIR

 The JAIR in collaboration with The Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India organized an Interaction between South African MP’s and Jadavpur Association of International Relations (JAIR) experts/academics on 12th December 2008 at Oberoi Grand.

 The book The Challenge of Terrorism edited by Radharaman Chakrabarti and Imankalyan Lahiri was formally inaugurated by Sri Vinod Kumar, Joint Secretary, Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India on 20 July 2009 at Calcutta Press Club. This book can offer a set of action areas for the government as well the is the most comprehensive, research-oriented publication on Terrorism published since 26/11 Mumbai attacks.

 JAIR registered itself as a non-profit organization in the NGO Partnership system launched by the Planning Commission, Government of India.

 The Association organized a lecture programme by Prof Anne Cheng from College de France organized in collaboration with ICSSR, Institute of Chinese Studies New Delhi and H.P Biswas India-China Cultural Study Programme. The programme took place on 12th March 2013 at Jadavpur University, Kolkata.

 The members of the Association were also invited by the Hon’ble Consul General of Bhutan in the year 2013 on the occasion of the celebration of Bhutan Day. The Association has also kept a very close relationship with the Consulates of Foreign Delegations in Kolkata.

 The Association completed its five years and celebrated the same on 28th April 2013 in the Department of International Relations, Jadavpur University.

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